Johnson County Man Sentenced to Over 16 Years for Drug Trafficking, Awaits Dog Fighting Charges

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Travis Lee Martin, also known as “Fat,” 42, from Johnson County, has been handed a sentence of 200 months in prison after admitting guilt to drug-related charges. This sentence comes after his involvement in a drug trafficking ring distributing methamphetamine and heroin across several counties, stated Jill E. Steinberg, U.S. Attorney for the Southern District of Georgia.

The sentencing was pronounced by U.S. District Court Judge Dudley H. Bowen, who also ordered Martin to pay a $5,000 fine and serve five years of supervised release following his prison term. The judge specified that Martin’s sentence would run consecutively to a forthcoming sentence related to dog fighting charges.

“This sentence is a testament to the outstanding investigation by the Laurens County Sheriff’s Office, the Drug Enforcement Administration, and other law enforcement agencies that identified and dismantled Martin’s multi-county drug trafficking and dog fighting operations,” remarked U.S. Attorney Steinberg.

Martin was among 12 co-defendants named in a 27-count indictment unveiled in December 2022, which detailed a drug conspiracy spanning several counties. The investigation, spanning three years, involved multiple searches resulting in significant drug, cash, and firearms seizures. Martin’s plea also involves the forfeiture of $80,050 in cash seized during the operation.

As part of the investigation, 96 dogs believed to be part of a dog fighting operation were rescued from various locations across Johnson, Laurens, and Washington counties. Martin and four co-defendants are awaiting sentencing after pleading guilty to Conspiracy to Violate the Animal Welfare Act.

The drug trafficking case was investigated by the Laurens County Sheriff’s Office and the Drug Enforcement Administration, with collaboration from various law enforcement agencies, and prosecuted by Assistant U.S. Attorney Jennifer J. Kirkland. The dog fighting prosecution was handled by the U.S. Department of Agriculture Office of Inspector General, with support from the U.S. Marshals Service and local law enforcement, and prosecuted by Special Assistant U.S. Attorney Jessica K. Rock.